University Drive: Study of Intermodal Interactions

Authors:

Jessica Anaya, Tiffany Chan, Norma Flores, Lorenzo Gonzalez, Cristina Graciano, Michelle Yang

Mentor:

Gwen Urey, URP professor, Cal Poly Pomona

Cal Poly Pomona is located in the suburbs, 26 miles from Los Angeles. Cal Poly has evolved as a commuter college. There are two freeways that feed directly into the campus, the I-10 and the SR-57. University Drive is centrally located in Cal Poly Pomona, it connects many students, faculty, and visitors from their locations to campus. However, this road can be a potential danger zone: drivers and pedestrians often battle for the right-of-way. This project attempts to identify any significant patterns of intermodal interactions between cars, pedestrians, and bicyclists and the built environment on University Drive. Three specific locations with crosswalks were chosen. Location 1 has a stop sign. Location 2 has a yield sign. Location 3 has three crosswalk and no sign. Interactions were videotaped at two of the busiest hours: the morning (8AM – 9AM) and afternoon (12PM – 1PM). Specific observations include counting the number of cars, pedestrians, and bicyclists as well as number of pedestrians illegally crossing and drivers improperly stopping or yielding. The results in location 1 show that when a high number of pedestrians are present, drivers obey the stop sign. When little to no pedestrians are present, then drivers would not make complete stops. At location 2, the morning rush hour had a crossing guard directing traffic, allowing for pedestrians to cross easily. Since location 2 is at the bottom of a hill, bicyclists’ speed increases; therefore are incautious of oncoming traffic. In location 2 and 3, when large groups of pedestrians are present, vehicular traffic would slow down. When an individual or a small group are present, pedestrians or drivers have to be aggressive to get to their destination. Also the fewer amount of cars, the higher the tendency of jaywalking. The identified patterns of interactions are primarily negative.


Presented by:

Jessica Anaya

Date:

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Time:

2:25 PM — 2:40 PM

Room:

Hoover 113

Presentation Type:

Oral Presentation

Discipline:

Other